Week 2: Photograms

Basic Black and White Photography with Matthew Swarts

William Henry Fox Talbot

William Henry Fox Talbot

Anna Atkins

Anna Atkins

Lazslo Maholy Nagy

Lazslo Maholy Nagy

Man Ray

Man Ray

Adam Fuss

Adam Fuss

Gary Fabian Miller

Gary Fabian Miller

Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell

1. Download and review arts1810 photogram slides from this week’s lecture on photograms.

2. Download the spec sheets for the enlarging paper we will be using, and review: ilford rc warmtone specs

3. Download the spec sheets for the Sprint Systems chemistry we will be using in the darkroom, and review: SPRINTQUICKSILVERPrintUSE

Remember: Add WATER to the CONCENTRATE and mix according to the manufacturer’s recommended dilution!

a. DEVELOP the print for 1 minute.

b. Place it in the STOP BATH for at least 30 seconds.

c. Place it in the FIXER for at least 1 minute.

d. Place it in the FIXER REMOVER for at least 1 minute.

e. WASH your print for at least 5 minutes!

f. Allow your print to fully DRY on the drying screens outside the darkroom.

4. Review and practice using the darkroom timer and review and practice stopping down aperture of the enlarging lens.  With first a small test strip cut from a full sheet of enlarging paper, determine the exposure time necessary to create a black on your paper by exposing the strip to light in gradations of several seconds at a time.  Use your processed strip as a reference for the background tonality of your photogram.

5. With the photographic paper provided in class, create 4-6 photograms with the translucent objects you brought to class.  Review how to make a photogram here.  Try your best to create images that, like the artist’s works above, depict volume, depth, and complexity across the frame.  Can you make photograms that have varying background tonalities? (That is: some could be black, some could be white, some could be in-between shades of grey.)

For inspiration, consider this short experimental film by Stan Brakhage, Mothlight, made entirely without the use of a camera!


FOR NEXT WEEK: 

We will be making pinhole cameras!

Bring to class: 1 cylindrical cardboard oatmeal container (about $1 in the supermarket) (empty). w/lid

Your box of photographic printing paper (do not open in the light!)

Any objects you might be curious about photographing with the camera you will make out of your oatmeal container!